Win de ‘Strike a Pose’ DVD! Wedstrijd update (meer kans om te winnen) Dutch competition only

Strike a Pose pack nl-2kleinNa de aankondiging van onze wedstrijd in samenwerking met Cinemien waarbij we 3 DVD’s mogen weggeven van de Strike a Pose DVD, hebben we signalen ontvangen van mensen die graag meedoen maar niet actief zijn op social media (en dus niet kunnen meedoen).

Hierbij geven we ook jullie een kans op de DVD, stuur een mailtje naar: madonnaunderground@gmail.com en beantwoord de volgende vraag:

‘wie zijn de regisseurs van ‘Strike a Pose’?

Meedoen kan tot en met woensdag!

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Win de Strike a Pose DVD! Lees snel verder voor meer info

Strike a Pose pack nl-2kleinWij mogen in samenwerking met Cinemien drie DVD’s weggeven van de indrukwekkende documentaire ‘Strike a Pose’, deze verschijnt op 8 september a.s. in de Nederlandse winkels.

Wil jij dat de DVD op jouw deurmat valt en je niet de bestelling hoeft te plaatsen via bijvoorbeeld bol.com, zorg er dan voor dat je uiterlijk woensdag 7 september een selfie plaatst op social media waar je jouw wijze van ‘striking a pose’ uitbeeld.

Vermeld hierbij #strikeaposeforMU + dat het gaat om het winnen van de Strike a Pose DVD via MadonnaUnderground.com

Succes!

This competition is open to people in Holland only

 

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New in Filmography: all about Madonna’s secretprojectrevolution

We conclude Madonna’s Filmography with her secretprojectrevolution, a project done with Steven Klein released in 2013. A short film dealing with artistic freedom and human rights, Madonna stated that she thought it was the most important thing she’d ever done.

We are now at the end of Madonna’s current Filmography, its been quite a ride compiling all the press articles, memorabilia, facts and videos for you. To browse through each and every movie Madonna participated in check out our absolute massive online Filmography.

In secretprojectrevolution you can find:

  • all the facts
  • the link to download
  • watch the film
  • watch the trailer
  • watch the promo interview
  • watch the playlist

Enjoy our Filmography, so we can focus on Madonna’s acting in on stage plays.

http-__i2.cdnds_.net_13_31_618x397_madonna-secret-project-trailer

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Vintage, Unpublished Photos — and Memories — of Kate Moss and Madonna

Ask Peter Lindbergh which year of his career he’d most like to relive, and he has plenty of good options. 1988 comes to mind: It’s the year he shot the iconic “white shirt” photo of Linda Evangelista, Karen Alexander, Christy Turlington, Estelle Lefébure, Tatjana Patitz and Rachel Williams at the beach — an image that would launch the careers of the then-unknown models, and of Lindbergh himself. It is regarded as the first artifact of the supermodel era. Or maybe 1994, the year he shot Madonna in a tribute to Martha Graham (never-before-seen photos from that session are in the slide show here, along with previously unpublished shots of Kate Moss, Gisele Bündchen and Lara Stone). Or 2002, the year he shot his second Pirelli calendar and became the first photographer to be exhibited at Moscow’s Pushkin Museum.

But Lindbergh has a different answer: “I would live the last 12 months again, as they have been extremely crazy: an unbelievable amount of projects, challenges, experimentation, freedom; extremely creative adventures, and a lot of satisfaction, too,” he told T in an email. It’s true: It’s been a big year for Lindbergh. He’s spent the last few months prepping a huge solo show at the Kunsthal Rotterdam opening Sept. 10, “A Different Vision on Fashion Photography,” which shares its title with a weighty upcoming Taschen monograph of the same name. He’s also recently wrapped the 2017 Pirelli calendar — he’s the only photographer who’s ever shot three — featuring Nicole Kidman, Robin Wright, Julianne Moore and others of their milieu. “Not to forget that my seventh grandchild is about to be born in the Villa Medici in Rome,” he adds.

To see more images and read more visit NYTimeslindberg

© Peter Lindbergh/Courtesy of Peter Lindbergh, Paris/Gagosian Gallery/TASCHEN

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News: Atlanta’s Out On Film Festival announces ambitious lineup for its 29th year (Strike a Pose)

Strike A Pose will open this year's Out On Film Festival.
Strike A Pose will open this year’s Out On Film Festival.

The Out On Film Festival will open its 29th year with a screening of Strike a Pose, a documentary about seven young male dancers who worked with Madonna on her controversial 1990 Blond Ambition tour.

The festival, which runs from September 29 through October 6 at Landmark’s Midtown Art Cinema, will include more than 110 feature films, documentaries, shorts and web series. It has grown into one of the premier LGBT film festivals in the country.

“This is an exceptional year for LGBT cinema,” says Out On Film director Jim Farmer. “This is, by far, our biggest festival to date in terms of the number of films we are showing, as well as the most diverse slate we’ve ever presented. It’s an amazing year, as well, for terrific features and documentaries by female directors.” [Full disclosure: Farmer is a theater and film writer for ArtsATL.]

Out On Film will close with Chris Kelly’s Other People, a film about a struggling comedy writer (Jesse Plemons), fresh off a breakup and in the midst of the worst year of his life, who has to return home to take care of his dying mother (Molly Shanon).

Several directors and actors will appear at the festival. Carlton Wilborn, one of Madonna’s former dancers featured in Strike A Pose will be in attendance for the screening of that movie. Actor Gregory Harrison and director Randal Kleiser (who also directed the iconic film Grease) will participate in a Q&A sessions following the screening of their It’s My Party. Kleiser will also receive Out on Film’s Icon Award.

Look for a full preview of the festival on ArtsATL in late September.

More at artsatl.com

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NFF OPENLUCHTBIOSCOOP: STRIKE A POSE (Utrecht 4 september) – Dutch news

sap11widget0Het Nederlands Film Festival presenteert in samenwerking met het Uitfeest de NFF Openluchtbios! Zoek een mooi plekje uit op het Stadhuisplein en geniet als preview op het filmfestival (21 t/m 30 september) van de internationaal succesvolle film Strike a Pose.

De spraakmakende documentaire Truth or Dare – In Bed with Madonna gaf in 1991 een kijkje achter de schermen van Madonna’s wereldtournee. De zeven jonge dansers (zes homo-, één heteroseksueel) die in de film te zien waren, durfden zichzelf te zijn en groeiden zo uit tot iconen van seksuele vrijheid. Maar het mooie beeld dat Madonna opriep, blijkt niet helemaal te kloppen. De dansers onthullen vijfentwintig jaar later de werkelijkheid over hun levens tijdens en na de Blond Ambition Tour, die de kijkers toen niet te zien kregen. In regie van Ester Gould en Reijer Zwaan.  filmfestival.nl

Er is een beperkt aantal zitplaatsen beschikbaar, kom op tijd of neem je eigen stoel/kleed mee.
  • zondag 4 september 21:00-23:00

Meer info hier

 

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New! Absolute massive ‘W.E.’ collection/archive in Filmography: all about the movie (memorabilia, press, rare videos!!)

Yes we are almost at the end of Madonna’s current Filmography, its been quite a ride and hope you enjoyed the tons and tons of scans, info and videos.

Madonna’s film ‘W.E.’ is nothing but stunning from start to finish in this visually beautifully done film. After her debut as a director with ‘Filth and Wisdom’, Madonna became obsessed with the story of King Edward III and Wallis Simpson and read every single thing she could find, just so she was sure the movie paid tribute to them. No one could deny that the film was a fiest for the eyes, every little detail, so subtle and wonderfully done. M deserved nothing but praise for this was only the second film for her to direct, and such a brave effort at that!

MadonnaUnderground is very proud to have helped with the Dutch promotion for the film, which was distributed by Dutch FilmWorks. We officially premiered the Dutch film poster, organised many competitions, attended screenings and just had an all over wonderful collaboration.

We have gathered so much for you to see in our W.E. online archives, lets sum it up:

  • Press – over 150 scanned articles from various magazines and newspapers!
  • Memorabilia – Rare releases such as the ‘For Your Consideration’ promo DVD and CD (for Masterpiece), official Dutch promo cd single for Masterpiece (it was the official 4th single in Holland), and much more!
  • Press stills – 74(!!) press stills all published with permission + some rare on set pictures by our team member Fred
  • Premiere Videos – various HD videos (including what we filmed at the BFI premiere)
  • Live Reports – Our personal reports on attending the BFI premiere in London with Madonna attending + what it was like being an extra on the set
  • Private Gallery – Our personal taken pictures at the BFI premiere + on the set of W.E.
  • Trailer – official Dutch trailer
  • Various Videos – view the making of, interview videos, Golden Globes and so much more!
  • Buy the film!

This one will take up some of your time, so sit back and relax and start clicking away in W.E.

Please view the entire Filmography by clicking here

wenews

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‘Truth or Dare’ Turns 25, But of Course Madonna Is Timeless

Truth or Dare, the documentary time capsule of Madonna’s iconic “Blonde Ambition” tour, just turned 25 years old. To celebrate, Metrograph, New York’s newest arthouse theater, is showing a weeklong run of the documentary in addition to a selection of seven films starring the singer in performances that range from strong and memorable to ridiculous.

Not all of the films are critically acclaimed—the erotic thriller Body of Evidence (1993), which features Madonna saying, “That’s what I do. I fuck,” in a moment of pure, obvious bad girl exposition is playing for the so-bad-it’s-good crowd. Who’s That Girl (1987) has Madonna doing a Judy Holliday voice and acting alongside a wildcat, which could be amazing if the zany plot wasn’t quite so thin and pointless.

The ultimate Madonna-as-actress film, of course, is her debut Desperately Seeking Susan (1985) in which she essentially plays herself: a downtown queen of jumbled accessories and sass who enchants all around her. In Dick Tracy (1990) she embodies the comic book femme fatale to an extent that would be eye roll-inducing were her provocateur status as a performer not already firmly in place. In the next two years, she’d have a small part in an atypical Woody Allen film (Shadows and Fog) and play a 1940s baseball player (A League of Their Own). While she’s been accused of not being the world’s greatest actress, the films selected here show that she can always cleverly play with her oversized persona, either reveling in its charms or choosing roles that seem like novel departures. Abel Ferrara’s gritty Dangerous Game (1993) makes for an interesting meta-commentary here, as Madonna plays an actress in a film about the making of a film, and we see her alternatively seductive and enraged, never quite sure who she really is. There aren’t many other pop stars who would immerse themselves in a world created by the director of Bad Lieutenant, for better and for worse. But for those who really want to see Madonna at the height of her powers and find some key to understanding her as a performer, Truth or Dare is the place to start.

Madonna as Breathless Mahoney in Dick Tracy.
“She was probably the most famous woman in the world at that point and the fact that she decided to allow the cameras to film her at that moment was a really fortuitous turn of events,” director and frequent Madonna collaborator Alek Keshishian told the Observer. Fortuitous not only for the director, but also for audiences both then and now: the documentary is revealing, finding moments of both extreme glamour and poignancy. We see Madonna not only performing onstage, as fierce and unapologetically sexual as we’d expect, but also catching up with a childhood friend, eating soup while talking on the phone with her father, and even visiting her mother’s grave.

Surprisingly, the film never feels forced or self-serious. It has moments of humor and a dynamic aesthetic, largely black and white with the concert sequences in lush color. There were practical as well as aesthetic reasons for shooting this way—as Keshishian recalls, “It seemed like an interesting division: the color for the artifice of the performance versus the reality of documentary, and yet each reflected the other. There was another practical consideration for the black and white, which was that the venues themselves were so ugly. Dressing rooms aren’t the prettiest places and black and white gives a kind of poetry. It also allowed me to use footage from different days since a lot of the venues looked the same.” The color choice also contributes to the iconography, giving the proceedings a feeling of being somehow out of time.
Many music documentaries rely on a workmanlike aesthetic that hides a directorial mark, but Keshishian knew from the start that he wanted to create something different. Truth or Dare was initially going to be more of a traditional concert film for HBO, but quickly moved in another direction. “I rented almost everything that had been done in the music documentary and concert arena, and then I decided not to watch any of them,” he said. “I didn’t want to be influenced, nor did I want to consciously avoid trying to do something. Sometimes it’s better not to know the rules.”

Going into the documentary without that “anxiety of influence,” worked well for the director, and part of what’s captivating about Truth or Dare, besides its highly charismatic subject, is the way we can see the seams—cameras and boom mikes are sometimes visible, and Madonna even refers to the director by name: “I had no incentive to try to hide the camera, though I certainly didn’t want to become the subject,” said Keshishian.

The subject reveals much of herself: one of the most striking motifs is the maternal bond she has with her dancers, all of whom are sassy, charming characters. The film strikes a fine balance between these moments of the maternal, good-humored Madonna and the diva. One of the most famous scenes has Madonna expressing ostentatious disdain after Kevin Costner calls her concert “neat.” Keshishian didn’t want to sensationalize: “I only used those moments because I thought they said something about Madonna. It shows she doesn’t do well with that kind of earnestness. You just see her with celebrities when they’re revealing something about her.” She has her own moments of vulnerability, and her admission that going home isn’t easy, say, is all the more striking after seeing her in her iconic cone bra, executing racy dance moves for a crowd of thousands. Balance is key to Truth or Dare—you can even see it in the title, which would fit even without the amusing scene in which she and her dancers play the game. Keshishian balanced the truth of the “real Madonna” with the daring of the performer quite purposefully: “The way the documentary ended up, I think if we removed even 10 minutes the balance would change significantly.”

Desperately Seeking Susan.

There isn’t a sense of bloated indulgence, nor is the narrative too thin, and there’s plenty more where all of the juicy, aesthetically pleasing footage came from. “We shot 250 hours,” the director recalls. “The movie ended up being two hours, and we edited it to get a complete portrait without it being redundant.”

These two hours create an eloquent document of a great performer, but one wonders what an extended cut might look like. At one point, Madonna’s then-boyfriend and director/star of Dick Tracy, Warren Beatty, remarks, “She doesn’t want to live off camera.” Watching Truth or Dare and the other films in the Metrograph series, we understand why she wouldn’t. Performing onstage, in one of her varied film roles, or just being herself, Madonna consistently captivates.

More at Observer.com

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New in Filmography: Madonna’s documentary ‘I Am Because We Are’ – watch the film, view memorabilia and more!

Next in Madonna’s Filmography is the documentary ‘I Am Because We Are’, written and produced by her. It showed the efforts the charitable organisation Raising Malawi made in helping to improve the lives and conditions. The documentary made its Dutch debut at the IDFA in 2008.

To view the entire film, see an interview and memorabilia visit I Am Because We Are now

  • Watch the entire documentary
  • See Madonna’s original introduction
  • See a detailed interview with Madonna on the documentary
  • View various memorabilia items
  • see the trailer
  • buy the film

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New York Today: Madonna’s Metropolis

Updated, 7:58 a.m.

Good morning on this moody Friday.

It’s a summer Friday. One of the last. So today we bring you a column on the lighter side.

In honor of the 25th anniversary of the Madonna documentary “Truth or Dare,” the Metrograph theater in Chinatown is running a retrospective of the performer’s film career, beginning on Saturday.

New York wasn’t easy for Madonna Louise Ciccone, according to J. Randy Taraborrelli, the author of “Madonna: An Intimate Biography.”

“It gave her the kind of draining experience that creates great artists,” he said. “She’s a product of the New York experience.”

We decided to take a tour of the Queen of Pop’s New York:

• We started in our apartment, in front of the iPad, and watched the city age alongside the singer in her videos for “Papa Don’t Preach” and “Secret.”

• Then we headed to Times Square, where, as legend has it, she arrived in 1978 with $35 in her pocket. She ate garbage out of trash cans. (We fact-checked: “Probably all mythology,” Mr. Taraborrelli said.)

• Madge’s first apartment, at 232 E. Fourth Street in the East Village, was “a roach motel,” according to her father. (No, we didn’t go there.)

Continue reading the main story

• She worked at a Dunkin’ Donuts on West 57th Street and at the Russian Tea Room, where she had a job in coat check and was fired, we were told. (We skipped the doughnut shop.)

• We read an essay in Harper’s Bazaar, in which she wrote that moving to the city was harsh at first. But like any proud New Yorker, she learned to love it:

“The sizzling-hot sidewalks and the noise of the traffic and the electricity of the people rushing by me on the streets was a shock to my neurotransmitters.”

“Blood pumping through my veins, I was poised for survival. I felt alive.”

More at NYTimes

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Why Madonna’s ‘Truth Or Dare’ Continues To Inspire & Influence Audiences 25 Years Later

In an age where social media, reality TV shows, and music documentary movies feel ubiquitous in providing fans with intimate access to their idols, it’s easy to forget that celebrity personas were previously much more private. So when Madonna’s Truth Or Dare documentary movie (also known as In Bed With Madonna) was released in 1991, it felt truly revolutionary and fresh. Once upon a time, fans only had interviews, newspaper gossip, and magazine profiles to rely on in gaining insight on their favorite stars, and often these impressions still felt stilted, and pre-programmed. But, chroniclingMadonna’s seminal Blond Ambition tour, the movie provided an intimate glimpse at the pop star and her life. The movie pulled back the curtain of celebrity to reveal both Madonna, the artist, and Madonna Louise Ciccone, the person.

25 years on from the movie’s release, which saw it gaining a cult-status amongst fans and the queer community, the film remains deeply inspiring, and its legacy can be felt right across pop culture. The movie managed to make an impact, not just in transgressing the boundaries between a celebrity and their fans, but also in providing a crucial reminder of how pop music, and feminist and queer rights, have developed since the early ’90s.

In 1990, when Truth Or Dare was filmed, the Blond Ambition tour was deeply controversial. Not only did the tour feature a scene of simulated female masturbation within a dance routine, but it also juxtaposed highly sexual choreography with Catholic imagery. By the time the tour reached Italy, the performance had become a scandal within the press, with the Pope even trying to get it banned. Two shows were cancelled among the tumult, andMadonna was even threatened with arrest in Toronto when law enforcement objected to the content of her dance routine for “Like A Virgin.”

This seems rightfully shocking to us in 2016, particularly when we have artists like Nicki Minaj, Lady Gaga, and the electro-pop artist Peaches using hyper-sexual imagery and choreography within their live shows and music videos. But, at the start of the ’90s, it was still deemed deeply inappropriate, criminaleven, for a female musician to proudly own her sexuality and to portray an expression of it on stage or in their videos.

via GIPHY

Read full article at Bustle.com

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