Review: Madonna, battling a cold and bad knee, brings fury to late night Madame X concert

It’s a wonder Madonna was ever able to play in vast arenas and stadiums.

At the Golden Gate Theatre on Tuesday, Nov. 5, performing the final date of her three-night Madame X tour residency in San Francisco, the 61-year-old singer seemed to take note of every little distraction in the room: the light-up flower crown someone was wearing in the 18th row; the exit door on the left side of the building that opened and closed a few times when a couple people dared go to the restroom; even the murmurs coming from the darkest corners of the balcony.

“Don’t talk while I’m talking,” she snapped. Adding for good measure, “Don’t talk while I’m not talking.”

To be fair, she is Madonna – a pop icon, cultural shape-shifter, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, mother, hero, survivor and so much more. She’s someone whose perennial desire for control has carried her farther than any of her peers, making her the highest-charting female musician and highest-grossing female touring musician in history.

On Tuesday at the 2,297-capacity Golden Gate Theatre (the concert was originally scheduled for Oct. 31 but delayed due to production issues), Madonna was battling a cold, suffering from a torn ligament and had a bad knee (“and no hours of sleep,” she said), but she still put on a spectacular show.

It was rife with bawdy humor, attitude, sex, loads of swear words and references to her private parts — basically everything you want from a Madonna concert. She demanded the same level of effort from her audience, despite inexplicably sweltering temperatures inside the theatre.

“You’re kind of lazy — just putting that out there,” Madonna said, midway through the show. “It’s OK. Because I’m not.”

Scenes from Madonna’s Madame X tour.Photo: Stufish

Madonna didn’t need to wear a bedazzled patch over her left eye and cloak herself as Madame X. She didn’t need to play a late show on a school night at a small, overheated theater on a dreggy corner off Market Street. She didn’t need to run through a two-hour-plus set crammed with songs from a new album that nobody truly loves.

But Madonna is hardly one to do things the easy way. Rather than book huge tour stacked with hits, which is what most fans who grew up with her music would have most likely preferred, she is slogging her way across the country performing long residencies in small venues in select cities, focusing almost entirely on material from her 14th studio recording, the dark and disorienting “Madame X.”

“I have wanted to have this intimate experience with my audience for three decades,” she said on Tuesday.

Despite the close-up environment, fans got the full Madonna spectacle, complete with 41 musicians, singers and dancers; several costume changes and video vignettes; and a lone typewriter used to clack away epitaphs for the crowd (“Artists are here to disturb the peace,” read a recurring quote from James Baldwin).

The songs on “Madame X,” are all over the place, bouncing between trap, hip-hop, reggaeton, Latin pop and electronic dance music without quite falling, erm, into the groove. Thematically, the record is wide-reaching too – touching on the personal, political, spiritual, sensual and everything in between.

But on stage she brought it all together, highlighting infectious new songs like “Crazy” and “I Don’t Search I Find,” alongside few choice classics such as a faithful rendition of “Vogue,” a capella singalong of “Express Yourself” and a thunderous set-closing “Like A Prayer.”

Scenes from Madonna’s Madame X tour.Photo: Stufish

As she glided across the stage to the retro house groove of the recent single “Crave,” featuring Swae Lee, it become clear where Katy, Miley, Britney, Gaga and Gwen all got their moves and gumption.

For all her defiance, Madonna remains a devoted artist, who elevated each tune with a completely original production revolving around her touring ensemble and theatrical show built around a pair of movable staircases and variety of projections.

Madonna highlighted her family at every turn, featuring oldest daughter Lourdes, 23, dancing in a dramatic video clip accompanying “Frozen;” and employing 13-year-old Mercy and 7-year-old twins Stelle and Estere as part of her live dance crew (maybe a little bit past their appropriate bed times).

She exerted her sense of control to the audience experience, taking the stage a little after 11 p.m. and prohibiting the use of cell phones, smart watches and photography (including press, instead supplying a pair of blurry shots of the stage).

Since its release in June, “Madame X” has sold only 90,000 copies in the US, less than half its predecessor, 2015’s “Rebel Heart,” which moved nearly 250,000 copies (and roughly 9,910,000 fewer copies than her best-seller, 1984’s “Like a Virgin”).

This tour feels like Madonna’s attempt to reestablish herself from the ground up.

Once a wise-cracking pair of eyebrows inseparable from the attitude and energy of New York City, she has spent the past few years dividing her time between her manor in London and a mansion in the village of Sintra, Portugal, where her teenage son David Banda attends a prestigious soccer academy.

At one point in the concert she recreated (with a smidge of cultural appropriation) a Portuguese nightclub on the stage, for a segment that found her playing musical tourist through “Killers Who Are Partying,” a fado flavored cut from the “Madame X” album; a cover of “Sodade,” a song made famous by Cesaria Evora; and the harder-edged “Batuka,” which found her backed by an ensemble of batuque drummers and singers called Orquestra Batukadeiras.

“You won’t see this anywhere else, no siree,” she said.

For the encore song, “I Rise,” the screen behind her came alive with recent news footage of protests and marches in solidarity with the resist movement, but as Madonna sang the verses it became apparent that the song was as much about her as current events: “I managed to survive/ Freedom’s what you choose to do with what’s been done to you.”

The last standing icon from pop’s halcyon days (her closest contemporaries, Michael Jackson, Prince and George Michael each died young) Madonna not only remains alive but she is embracing every moment of her existence.

“Nobody is anybody’s bitch,” she said. “I can’t spell it out any clearer than that.”

She meant it.

More at SFChronicle.com

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Mega Record & CD Fair | Jaarbeurs Utrecht, The Netherlands November 16 & 17, 2019 (DISCOUNT AVAILABLE)

Are you ready for world’s largest record fair at the Jaarbeurshallen in Utrecht on November 16 & 17? For our visitors we have a special discount code available, but is very limited so be quick: GRTS000455RXP

Buy your tickets and use the code through THIS LINK 

Make sure to check your spam box if your tickets haven’t been delivered to your inbox within seconds. 

Dear Crate Diggers,

Only one weeks to go before the 52nd Mega Record & Cd Fair will take place at Jaarbeurs Utrecht on Saturday the 16th and Sunday the 17th of November. At this fair cratediggers, vinyl lovers, musicians and over 600 dealers from all over the globe come together to buy records, attend the Omega vinyl auction and several book presentations, watch live performances by George ‘Little Green Bag’ Baker and Robert Jan Stips and visit exhibitions in the field of music. This Autumn, the fair will show a major photo exhibition with pictures made by photographer Frits van Swoll.

Buy your tickets in advance online and save money & time not standing in the queue. Look for all information and the dealers list on our website or join us on Facebook and Instagram.

We are looking forward to meet you all at the unbeatable Mega Record & CD Fair in Utrecht!

Kind regards, the ARC Team

 

Many thanks to ARC

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Madonna disturbs the peace, enthralls with Madame X Tour (REVIEW)

Madonna, in the midst of her Madame X theater tour, continues to follow fellow trailblazer James Baldwin’s philosophy that “artists are here to disturb the peace.”

In fact, the pop icon opens her 11-city extravaganza — which this writer experienced Oct. 6 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Howard Gilman Opera House in New York City— with a passage from the activist/ novelist/playwright containing said quotation.

No stranger to disturbing the peace, Madonna has fueled cultural conversations on age, gender, race, religion and sexuality, among other social mores, over the last 35-plus years. She’s still pushing buttons with her latest live outing, which kicked off Sept. 17 in Brooklyn. Per Billboard Boxscore, the run of 16 sold-out shows at BAM grossed a robust $9.6 million.

Madonna’s previous 10 tours — filling mainly arenas and stadiums — grossed in excess of $1.3 billion, a record among female acts. The superstar will have played 50-odd Madame X shows in eight U.S. cities by year’s end, including four dates at The Met Philadelphia in December. In early 2020, the singer-songwriter heads to Portugal, England and France.

Over the course of her impressive two-hours-plus production, the Queen of Pop invites fans into the world of Madame X, the everywoman persona she adopted for her like-titled 15th album of all-new material. The “master of reinvention,” eager to stand out as a renegade early on, earned the Madame X nickname from Martha Graham while a student at the legend’s dance school.

In Madame X’s world, Madonna, in the guise of a secret agent, travels around the globe, changes identities, fights for freedom and brings light to dark places. Stufish Entertainment Architects created the show’s sets, which include mapped video projection, large-scale video images, staircases and other reconfigurable scenic pieces able to move around like a Rubik’s Cube.

Prior to Madonna taking the stage — which occurs between 10:30 and 11 p.m. — members of her band perform delightful instrumental selections, including several of the icon’s hits missing from the Madame X Tour.

Insistent that audiences watch her latest spectacle through their own eyes — cellphones and smartwatches, for instance, get locked in Yondr cases upon venue entry — Madonna ensures an intimate theatrical experience, minus a sea of devices feverishly capturing moments.

‘Wake up’

In the opening segment, a silhouette figure sits at a typewriter, repeatedly pounding Baldwin’s sentiments — such as the aforementioned quote and “Art is here to prove that all safety is an illusion” — into viewers’ heads. Sounds of gunshots fill the theater, with Madonna appearing in front of a distressed-American-flag backdrop.

The star, wearing a Revolutionary War ensemble complete with feathered tricorn hat, starts to sing “God Control,” which tackles the ever-controversial topic of gun control. With her jaw sounding like it’s wired shut, Madonna, despite such constrictions, vents her anger over America’s easy access to firearms and gun brandishers’ God complex.

Glorious cascading disco strings counter the dark subject matter of “God Control,” with Madonna insisting “we need to wake up.” The singer-dancer brings the joy of disco and freedom, which she enjoyed upon moving from Michigan to New York City at age 19, into a world where trigger-happy individuals silence such joy. During the on-stage chaos, Madonna and her fellow freedom fighters tangle with riot-shield-wielding police officers.

Concert goers have little time to digest “God Control” — whose music video depicts a shooting similar to the 2016 Pulse-nightclub massacre in Florida — before Madonna moves on to the bizarrely fascinating “Dark Ballet.” For this track, Madonna drew inspiration from another of history’s fearless females, burned-at the-stake Joan of Arc. Fittingly, with the warrior canonized as a Roman Catholic saint, religious imagery informs the performance.

Now sporting her ubiquitous “X” eye patch, Madonna tangles with ominous-looking characters in gas masks and floral headgear, dancing the “Dark Ballet,” which she says “we’re all dancing right now, in this world.” Also influenced by Stanley Kubrick’s nihilistic “A Clockwork Orange,” the number features a frantic piano break, plus a vocal distortion set to Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Reed Flutes,” from “The Nutcracker.”

Casual fans hoping Madonna lightens the mood with carefree classics such as “Holiday,” “Open Your Heart,” “Music” and “Hung Up,” take note: those hits and more take a time out for Madame X. Though with a staggering 64 different songs reaching the U.S. and/or U.K. top 10 singles charts, even a tour promising “all the big hits” could never live up to such a pledge.

As with her recent tours, Madonna — in fine voice — leans heavily on new material, performing a dozen “Madame X” tracks. Nonetheless, she revisits her back catalog early on with 1994′s “Human Nature.” A response to the “Erotica”-album/“Sex”-book backlash of 1992, the track reaffirms the singer’s express-yourself-don’t-repress-yourself, no-regrets stance. During the performance, she exhibits her athleticism by doing a handstand in a circular hole.

Madonna, a first-year-eligible 2008 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, follows “Human Nature” with an a cappella chorus of her 1989 female-empowerment classic “Express Yourself.” A slew of females join the sing-along, including youngest daughters Mercy James, Stella and Estere.

Following a “Madame X Manifesto” video interlude, look-alike secret-agent blondes in sunglasses and trench coats parade around as Madonna performs 1990′s game-changing “Vogue.” During “I Don’t Search I Find” — which nods to “Vogue” bass line and Madonna’s “Erotica”-era spoken-word vocals — the singer endures an interrogation by film-noir-/“Dick Tracy”-like detectives.

Politics return via a brief rendition of 1986′s “Papa Don’t Preach,” with Madonna altering a key lyric to “I’m not keeping my baby.” Despite the change, the message of bodily autonomy remains firmly intact.

Madonna then straps on a guitar to revisit “American Life,” in which she realizes “nothing is what it seems” when it comes to living the American dream. To her far right, ripped uniforms descend onto a dancer, with clips from the song’s war-themed fashion-show video — pulled from release around the time of the 2003 invasion of Iraq — as a backdrop. The act closes with soldiers carrying a flag-draped coffin across the stage.

Going global

For the show’s next section, Madonna — in a brunette wig — spotlights the global influences behind her latest album. Upon its release in June, “Madame X” — the singer’s most adventurous and experimental album in more than a decade — became her ninth No. 1 album and 15th top two title on the Billboard 200 albums chart.

Madonna likely was not pondering her next chart feat — or the 300 million-plus albums and singles she’s sold, making her one of history’s most successful recording artists — when she moved to Lisbon, Portugal, in 2017. There to support son David’s soccer career, the Queen of Pop found musical inspiration in the Portuguese capital.

After seeing passionate, not-in-it-for-money musicians perform in living rooms and small clubs, Madonna was intent on turning what she heard upside down, whether fado, morna, funaná or other genres. Aside from Portugal, territories such as Africa, Brazil, India and Spain influenced the musical direction of “Madame X.”

Call-and-response song “Batuka” starts the show’s musical globe-trot, with the dancing, hand-drumming and singing talents of the all-female Orquestra Batukadeiras. Madonna’s “Batuka” music video points out how “Batuque is a style of music created by women that originated in Cape Verde, some say the birth place of slave trade.”

Seeing drumming as an act of rebellion, the church condemned drums and took them away from the slaves. Nonetheless, the women continued singing and dancing, with “Batuka” spotlighting the Batukadeiras’ journey from darkness to light, their souls unbroken. The women also lend their talents to other numbers throughout the evening.

Madonna then opens her fado café, performing a cover of Carlos Zel’s “Fado Pechincha” with Portuguese guitarist Gaspar Varela, great-grandson of late fado singer Celeste Rodrigues. The mood gets more somber with “Killers Who Are Partying.” Here, Madonna pledges to take on the burdens of marginalized individuals, calling out powerful men celebrating and abusing their power, amid minorities’ degradation and suffering.

“Killers,” which tests the devotion of fans wanting the tempo to pick up some, features Portuguese singing in spots, as does “Crazy,” an accordion-infused midtempo love song that brings some classic Madonna pop into the café. A mash-up of non-album track “Welcome to My Fado Club” and the 1986 classic “La Isla Bonita” precedes another fado cover, the 1950s tune “Sodade,” which Cesária Évora popularized in the early 1990s.

Colombian heartthrob Maluma appears via video for festive cha-cha-cha duet “Medellín,” with Madonna then recounting her global identity search in the morna-inspired “Extreme Occident.” The music of India’s Rajasthan, along with tabla music, influenced part of the song.

Rising above

While rehearsing for the Madame X Tour, Madonna teased a possible performance of “Rescue Me,” an oft-forgotten gem from her mega-selling 1990 “Immaculate Collection” compilation. A verse from the song does pop up, albeit as an interlude set to the flailing movements of dancers, before the classic strings of 1998′s “Frozen” fill the BAM venue.

Madonna, wearing a head scarf, remains stationary as she sings the “Ray of Light”-era single, while a mesmerizing giant projection of eldest daughter Lourdes takes over the stage. The pop goddess’ 23-year-old offspring clearly has inherited mom’s spellbinding charisma, presence and gift for performance art.

“Come Alive,” another highlight, contains Madonna-mantra lyrics such as “Stand out, no I don’t wanna blend in, why you want me to?” The music of North Africa’s Gnawa tribe inspired the peace-seeking, see-the-world track, which features an instrument with origins in slavery. Turning darkness into light upon their freedom, slaves transformed the shackles that enslaved them into music — percussion instruments called krakebs.

Though Madonna’s previously performed atop a piano, she takes a seat at the instrument to play “Future,” a Jamaican dancehall track with hip-hop act Quavo about the current state of the world and the future of civilization. Madonna and her troupe then return to the disco for a dance mix of “Crave,” a collaboration with rapper/singer Swae Lee.

For the night’s penultimate number, Madonna, dressed in a black robe, leads a rousing rendition of “Like a Prayer.” Clips from the controversial video, released 30 years ago, surround the singer and her crew, which includes the Batukadeiras choir.

Closing the show, Madonna again champions marginalized individuals. “I Rise,” which she wrote in part to mark the Stonewall uprising’s 50th anniversary, inspires listeners to hope, speak their minds, and stay true to — and love — themselves. Back in June, “I Rise” closed Madonna’s Pride Island set, held during LGBTQ WorldPride NYC festivities.

Madonna and company, fists raised, conclude the night by walking down the center aisle. For a fleeting moment, the icon and fans — in close-enough-to-touch proximity — share a moment of we’ll-rise-above-it-all solidarity.

Such interaction exemplifies the Madame X Tour’s intimacy. Early in the show, Madonna snaps a Polaroid selfie and invites bidders to the front of the stage. She sells the photo to a fan willing to fork over the most cash, a move that may seem very “Material Girl.” However, the philanthropist insists the money — topping $5,000 on occasion — goes to her Raising Malawi charity.

Speaking to the audience more frequently than in past tours, the ever-humorous, chatty Madonna even asks the crowd, “Am I talking too much?” Among other atypical moments, she engages in audience banter and ventures out to dance on one side of the audience.

Madonna’s more personable demeanor, notably, takes nothing away from the levels of showmanship and risk-taking that have defined her storied career. Refusing to play it safe — she easily could mount hits tour after hits tour — Madonna challenges audiences to open their eyes to the world around them, respect her vision and trust that she will deliver her usual powerhouse production.

As Madame X requests in “Medellín,” take a trip with her — she’ll be so good for you.

More at Poconorecord.com

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Madonna Fan Party G-A-Y Late Saturday 25th January 2020

The 2020 Madonna Fan Party event will take place at G-A-Y Late on Saturday 25th January from 3.00pm – the day before Madonna opens her series of shows in London. This will be our 31st event in collaboration with Madonna’s team, and it kicks off three weeks of Madonna Mania as the Queen takes over London.

RSVP here for all the event information: https://www.facebook.com/events/1793343664143175/

Madonna fans from London, the UK and around the world are travelling to London for the opening night of Madonna’s 15-night run. Come and join them all for a non-stop Madonna weekend! With Madonna, her team & dancers in town, you never know who might just pop in….so make sure you’ve got your best Madonna-inspired outfit or Madonna T Shirt on, as we may invite some guests to help us award spot prizes…

Entry as always is free – no ticket is required, however please RSVP as ‘Going’ (not ‘Interested’) on the Facebook Event Page.

Early Entry (aka ‘Queue Jump’) details & Prize Draw details will be published on our Facebook Event Page.

This will be our 2020 event – thanks for all of your continued support over the years. We rely on you making the effort to come to continue these events and to keep them free for everyone.

Madame X is … coming to London. Are you?

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The Best Albums of the 2010s: Madonna’s ‘Madame X’

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Rebel Heart Tour European premiere in Cologne (4 years ago today) photo gallery, video & more

Madonna’s Rebel Heart Tour opened in Cologne Germany four years ago today! 

I still remember it like yesterday; it was freezing cold and many fans queued up overnight to secure the best spots in the Lanxess Arena (quite a departure from the reserved seating at Madame X’s theater shows). Madonna started the show late, leading to quite a few people leaving their front row spots early as they were being crushed in the crowd. 

Apart from our compilation live video below we have the following for you to check out:

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Tatler Magazine celebrates its 310th anniversary with retrospective 80s covers of Miss Piggy, Madonna and Kylie Minogue

Tatler Magazine is celebrating its 310th issue by paying homage to one of its best decades: the 1980s.

The luxury society title has released a number of vintage covers from the period kickstarted by legendary editor Tina Brown, which saw stars including Madonna, Kylie Minogue, Miss Piggy and a curiously costumed Vivienne Westwood cover its issues. 

In the December issue the British publication celebrates a rich history, including being on the scene when “Trump tower opened in New York in 1983” as well as its 1982 purchase by publishing powerhouse Conde Nast.

Indisputable 80s icon Madonna also posed for the magazine in an unusual shoot, which saw her draped in towels and a stack of silver bangles with a signature crucifix hanging from her forehead. 

Full article at Standard.co.uk

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If You’re Going to Madonna, She Goes On at 10:30

With the evergreen pop music icon starting her three-show stint at the Golden Gate Theatre tonight, legions of die-hard Madonna devotees are expected to flood the amphitheater for her almost sold-out Madame X Tour stop – albeit very (very) late in the evening.

The postponed SF leg of her latest tour – that, originally, included a single Halloween night show, which was moved back and expanded to include two more weekday appearances – is unlike any concert series she’s done in decades.

(Read: cellphone and camera-free, smaller-scale, longer, more intimate “conversations” with the audience, etc..)

And, for San Francisco, the two-and-a-half-hour performance is also going to be a late one; Mercury News reported the times had been “inexplicably changed” from 8:30 pm to now 10:30 pm for all three nights, with Madonna not musing from the mainstage till perhaps 11 pm or later.

Alas, it looks like showgoers won’t be hailing rideshare till around 1 am – and that’s if everything goes according to plan. Though, you should prepared for an ungodly late 2 am show closing.

And if you want to take BART to and from the show, cross your fingers and burn an effigy to whatever deity you believe in…so that you’ll make the train’s final boarding time.

BART’s final northbound train will pass through Powell Street Station around 12:10 am, the last southbound train following at 1:05 a.m. However, getting to the Golden Gate Theatre when the doors open at 7:30 pm shouldn’t pose that much of an issue. It’s getting back that may cause a headache.

But patient (and highly-caffeinated) ticket holders can look forward to a setlist that includes every single track from her most recent LP Madame X, a celebrated return to form. Below the list of played tracks, per her most recent show at the Chicago Theatre on the 16th of last month, according to setlist.fm:

“God Control”
“Dark Ballet”
“Human Nature”
“Express Yourself”
“Papa Don’t Preach”
“Madame X Manifesto”
“Vogue”
“I Don’t Search I Find”
“Papa Don’t Preach”
“American Life”
“Batuka”
“Fado Pechincha”
“Killers Who Are Partying”
“Crazy”
“La Isla Bonita”
“Sodade”
“Medellín”
“Extreme Occident”
“Rescue Me”
“Frozen”
“Come Alive”
“Future”
“Crave”
“Like a Prayer”
“I Rise”

Tickets for tonight’s show, as well as those for Monday and Tuesday’s, are still up for grabs, hefty price tags and all. Seats for this evening’s spectacle, available on the San Francisco Theatre’s website, start at a soul-crushing $835, with more affordable – but, still, by no means frugal – tickets starting at $290 for both weekday shows.

And sorry: It looks like you won’t have the chance to meet the Hung Up singer in person, either. Even the VIP packages that top $2K don’t include meet-and-greets, so don’t expect to get up close and personal with the Vogue-ing legend, herself.

Can’t make the show or simply want to delve into the world of Madame X? Check out her released music videos from the album, below:

RelatedMadonna To Bring Madame X Tour To SF’s Golden Gate Theater This Fall

More at Sfist.com

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Nobody Knows Me discography online (promo only release)

Next up in the discography is the promotional only release for ‘Nobody Knows Me’. Though not released as a single, the track was delivered to DJ’s on promotional 12″ for club play. A music video montage with the AVIDDIVA Remix was also released.

Madonna performed the track during her Re-Invention Tour in 2004. She used it again at The MDNA Tour as an interlude backdrop video which was criticised heavily for showing a swastika on Marine Le Pen’s forehead. 

We have collected four items in its discography HERE

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Madonna Madame X Tour: 7 things fans need to know

Madonna is finally bringing her Madame X Tour to San Francisco, set to perform three nights, Nov. 2, 4 and 5 at the lovely Golden Gate Theatre.

Here are seven things fans should know before going to the show:

1, The late, late show

The shows now start late — really late. The curtain time has been inexplicably changed from 8:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. And our guess is that Madonna actually won’t take the stage until more like 11 p.m.

2, It’s a long show

The run time is approximately 2 hours 20 minutes. So, do the math and what you get is that fans will still be at the Golden Gate Theatre at 1 a.m. If the curtain goes up late, that finish time could get closer to 2 a.m.

3, Don’t BART

Sure, it will likely get you to the show on time. But it’s looking real dicey that it’ll get you home after the concert. The last northbound train is scheduled to pass through Powell Street Station (the closet station to Golden Gate Theatre) at 12:22 a.m. on Nov. 2., with the last southbound train following at 1:05 a.m. Madonna might still be onstage at those times.

4, Doors open early

The doors open at 7:30 p.m., which is three hours prior to show time. Organizers are asking that fans arrive no later than 9:30 p.m.

5, Tickets are SUPER expensive

Prices range from (gulp!) $74 to $2,111. The latter is a special VIP ticket that includes a pre-show reception with beverages and light appetizers. But don’t think you’re getting a meet and greet. “No Artist participation included in package,” the ticketing website informs.

6, But tickets might still be available

At last check, there were tickets still available for the Nov. 4 and 5 shows. See broadwaysf.com for more details.

7, The set list

Here’s what Madonna performed on Oct. 16 at the Chicago Theatre, according to setlist.fm:

“God Control”

“Dark Ballet”

“Human Nature”

“Express Yourself”

“Papa Don’t Preach”

“Madame X Manifesto”

“Vogue”

“I Don’t Search I Find”

“Papa Don’t Preach”

“American Life”

“Batuka”

“Fado Pechincha”

“Killers Who Are Partying”

“Crazy”

“La Isla Bonita”

“Sodade”

“Medellín”

“Extreme Occident”

“Rescue Me”

“Frozen”

“Come Alive”

“Future”

“Crave”

“Like a Prayer”

“I Rise”

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SEE: The Queen of Pop get intimate (in San Francisco)

No, not THAT kind of intimate. We’re talking about Madonna and her Madame X tour, which comes to San Francisco for three shows starting Nov. 2. She’s performing at the small-ish Golden Gate Theatre rather than a big rock palace. And it’s said to be one of her most personal shows yet. Or if you want a singer-songwriter with a lot fewer bells and whistles, the terrific Lucinda Williams will be in Oakland performing one of the ’90s best albums. Here’s a look at these and other concert options.

More at SantaCruzSentinel

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Niki Haris & Donna De Lory present SONGS AND STORIES at Mmhmmm at The Standard Hotel in West Hollywood

Acclaimed recording artists and Madonna’s famed backup singers Niki Haris and Donna De Lory will reunite for a night of nostalgia in which they share the soundtrack of their lives at Mmhmmm in the Standard Hotel in West Hollywood on Friday, November 22, at 7:30pm, it was announced today by Chris Isaacson Presents.

In this singular celebration, these soulful sisters will serenade the audience with perfect harmonies crafted from Niki’s jazzy belt and Donna’s breathy tone. Their music carries a rare kinetic energy forever pulsing between these kindred spirits. Each song is a defining moment among the many stories they’ve amassed over their stunning careers as they track their personal evolution from backup singers to solo artists to motherhood.

Niki Haris is the daughter of Grammy Award-nominated jazz pianist Gene Harris. She has toured the world’s biggest stages from Carnegie Hall to Wembley Stadium, Lincoln Center, Staples Center, and everywhere in between. Known for her jazz, gospel, pop, and deep house vocals, she has performed with jazz greats like Stanley Turrentine, Red Holloway, and Ray Charles, as well as pop superstars Sheryl CrowWhitney Houston. Along with singing backup for Madonna on four world tours, she appeared in the movie Truth or Dare and acted in the videos for Vogue and Music.

Donna De Lory comes from a musical family helmed by her father Al De Lory, legendary keyboard player for The Wrecking Crew and Grammy Award-winning music producer. She has been performing professionally since she was eight years old. Her vocal work can be heard on albums by Carole KingLeonard CohenCarly Simon, Jewel, Ray Parker Jr., Kim CarnesLaura BraniganBelinda Carlisle, Selena, Bette Midler, Aisha, Barry Manilow, and more. For nearly 20 years she worked as a backup singer and dancer with Madonna, beginning with the Who’s That Girl Tour in 1987 and continuing through the Confessions Tour in 2006. As a recording artist, she has released 14 solo albums including her most recent, Here in Heaven. In 2016 she teamed up with Niki Haris to record their rendition of Madonna’s 1993 single Rain, for which the pair provided the original backing vocals.

Admission is $35-$75 (VIP and Artist Circle available which include post-show meet and greet) and tickets may be purchased online at www.ticketweb.com or by phone at (866) 468-3399. Doors open at 6pm for cocktail and dinner service (minimums apply) and showtime is 7:30pm.

The Standard Hotel is located at 8300 Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood, 90069.

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